Using forest inventories to locate and map areas containing, or managed to contain, old-growth attributes. Spatially identifying these areas leads to their designation as legal or non-legal old-growth management areas.

Stubble height is the measurement of the height of grass after grazing occurs and is an indicator of the volume of grass that can be safely grazed without causing significant harm to the forage species; grazing too much of the grass plant will stop root growth36 and reduce survival. Appropriate stubble heights vary by grass species based on growth characteristics.

A tree or tall-shrub dominated wetland with mineral or occasionally peat soils that experiences periodic flooding and nearly permanent subsurface water flow. The waters are nutrient rich.

Refers to species or communities that are eventually replaced by other species or communities through succession.

A tree or tall-shrub dominated wetland with mineral or occasionally peat soils that experiences periodic flooding and nearly permanent subsurface water flow. The waters are nutrient rich.

Management regimes applied to forest land which maintain the productive and renewal capacities as well as the genetic, species and ecological diversity of forest ecosystems.

Preservation and protection of diverse ecosystems―the soil, plants, animals, insects and fungi―while maintaining the forest’s productivity.

A state or process that can be maintained indefinitely. The principles of sustainability integrate three closely interlined elements-the environment, the economy and the social system-into a system that can be maintained in a healthy state indefinitely.

A unit of the Biogeoclimatic Ecological Classification with less climatic variability and a narrower geographic distribution than the zone. Subzones are distinguished by a unique composition of plant species. They are climatically based and represent precipitation and temperature regimes.