In June 2014, the Forest Practices Board (Board) conducted a full scope audit of forest planning and practices on Carrier Lumber Ltd. (Carrier) Forest Licence (FL) A18158, in the Prince George District. Carrier’s activities were located in 10 different operating areas—six in the Prince George District and four in the Fort St. James District.

The Board conducted a full scope compliance audit, in which all harvesting, roads, silviculture, fire protection activities and associated planning, carried out between June 1, 2012, and June 19, 2014, were included. These activities were assessed for compliance with the Forest and Range Practices Act (FRPA), the Wildfire Act (WA) and related regulations

The audit found that the planning and field activities undertaken by Carrier on FL A18158 complied with the requirements of FRPA, WA and related regulations.

This audit examined the activities of the BC Timber Sales (BCTS) program and timber sale licence (TSL) holders in the Fort St. James District.

The communities in this district depend heavily on the forest industry but also rely on resourcessuch as water, fish, and wildlife to provide economic diversity and to meet cultural and tourism needs. At a time when mountain pine beetle infestations and subsequent timber salvage are high, BCTS and TSL holders face many challenges when balancing resource interests with salvage operations.

As part of the Forest Practices Board’s 2011 compliance audit program, the Board selected the Fort St. James District as the location for a full scope compliance audit. Within the district, the Board selected six woodlot licences for audit. The Board audited woodlot licences W0657, W0295, W1893, W1431, W1881 and W1888.

This is the audit report for woodlot licences W1431, W1881 and W1888.

As part of the Forest Practices Board’s 2011 compliance audit program, the Board selected the Fort St. James District as the location for a full scope compliance audit. Within the district, the Board selected six woodlot licences for audit. The Board audited woodlot licences W0657, W0295, W1893, W1431, W1881 and W1888.

This is the audit report for woodlot licences W0295 and W1893.

As part of the Forest Practices Board’s 2011 compliance audit program, the Board selected the Fort St. James District as the location for a full scope compliance audit. Within the district, the Board selected six woodlot licences for audit. The Board audited woodlot licences W0657, W0295, W1893, W1431, W1881 and W1888.

This is the audit report for woodlot licence W0657.

In September 2010, Batnuni Lake Guides and Outfitters (the complainant) submitted a complaint to the Forest Practices Board that L&M Lumber Co. Ltd. (the licensee) was not seasonally-blocking motorized access to the road system in their Davidson Creek operating area (the Davidson). This caused the complainant to lose a key business opportunity guiding hunters by horse in a non-motorized area.

Since 1994, when not being used for industrial purposes, the Davidson road system has been closed every winter to motorized use by putting concrete barriers in front of the bridge at the start of the road. In 1997, the Vanderhoof Land and Resource Management Plan (LRMP)formalized this practice by designating access into the Davidson as ‘semi-primitive, nonmotorized’(SPNM), and specifying that recreationalists, including hunters, could not use vehicles in the area between April 1 and November 30 each year.

In June 2011, the Stellat’en First Nation of Fraser Lake (the Stellat’en) asked the Forest Practices Board to investigate government approval of plans by Fraser Lake Sawmills (the licensee) to re-align and widen several haul roads through traditional Stellat’en territory.

The Stellat’en asserted that a major haul road would seriously disrupt traditional uses of their territory and that consultation and accommodation of Stellat’en interests by both the licensee and the government were inadequate.

While on the surface this complaint is about the adequacy of consultation, the Board found that much of the concern was about accommodation, particularly compensation.

In July 2010, the Board conducted a full-scope compliance audit of Pacific Inland Resources (PIR).The Board notes PIR’s commitment to work with the community to ensure operations are consistent with land management plans in the area.

In May 2009, the Upper Nechako Wilderness Council (the complainant) submitted a complaint that Canadian Forest Products Ltd. (the licensee) had harvested timber within a lakeshore management reserve used by the complainant’s member businesses for guided-wilderness moose hunts and hike-in fishing. The complainant said the proximity of the cutblock to the lake has caused its member businesses to abandon the lake as part of their wilderness-business operations.

The complainant is concerned that, under the Forest and Range Practices Act, a forest licensee has the authority to make land use decisions that can negatively impact the values of its member businesses. As a result, the complainant is worried about what may happen in future to other lakes its members use for similar business purposes.

British Columbia is engulfed in a province-wide mountain pine beetle outbreak. Salvaging value from the dead pine trees is a government priority. To facilitate the salvage effort, government increased the allowable annual cut (AAC) by 80 percent in the three most severely affected timber supply areas; the Lakes, Prince George and Quesnel TSAs, which are also the study areas for this project.

The increased AAC led to concerns about the stewardship of non-timber values such as wildlife and biodiversity. To accommodate these concerns, the “timber uplift” (AAC increase) was to be accompanied by a “conservation uplift” (an increase in retention of mature forest structure in harvested areas).